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Knocked Off: Kids Surfboard Table and Stools

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A few weeks ago, a friend of mine posted a Facebook status about looking for donations for a silent auction benefiting the Austin Boxer Rescue. Being the proud mama of a lovely little brindle Boxer myself (the ever-entertaining Rory) I knew I had to build something. But what? I eyed my large stash of scraps, and started searching through the Ana archives. And what did I find? This plan for a PB Kids inspired surfer table and stools!

 

Source: ana-white.com via Killer on Pinterest

 

Super cute right? And the best part was that I had everything I needed in my scrap pile! Top it off with using paint and stain from my shed makes it a pretty much no-cost project. That’s the best kind, in my opinion!

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I decided to go with the same two-tone finish as my stair leg console, even down to the glaze distressing. It gives the table a really worn in look. Very beachy.

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I chose coral for the details because I wanted it to be subtle from a distance, as well as looking like it had aged over time. I traced the edges with a fine-tipped Sharpie for a little added definition.

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I also decided to add some fun “surfer dude” sayings to the stools.

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I cannot wait to bring this to auction! One (or two) lucky kiddo is going to be the proud new owner of a kick ass hand-built table. I wanted to try snapping a pic with cutie patootie Charlie on them, but she’s still way too little for these. The age range is more like 3-6 rather than infant sized. And once the kids grow out of it, you can always repurpose the table as a bench or coffee table!

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In fact, without the paint job, there’s really no difference size wise from a coffee table or bench. I love the oblong slatted look it has. It would look great in a distressed white or red, or even a dark stain. And the stools would be great as-is. I have to admit, the splay legs (from a double-bevel construction) were a bit tough for me at first, but once I got the hang of it they were really easy to put together. Plus it makes them super sturdy, so the kiddos will be able to rough house on them without fear of collapse. I am so, so excited to deliver these! I hope it saves a few pups too :)





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  1. Stephanie

    Hey Brooke, I left you on comment on Ana’s site but figured you would probably check your own site more regularly…

    I have a couple questions regarding your finish…. It’s beautiful by the way!! Do you mean for this to be an outdoor set? Did you finish the top slats before you attached them to the bottom and did you fill the pocket holes? I’m working on an outdoor set now and would love to stain it instead of paint but am leary since I’m using top choice pine and not cedar or pressure treated… Just wondering how furring strips, stained hold up outside? Thanks

    1. How strange, did it not post? I responded to it yesterday. I try to keep up with Ana’s site, at least the brag board since I get notifications. Anyway…

      I intend this set to be an indoor play set. I built the entire piece unfinished first, because I wanted to get the curves perfect for the ends. So no finishing before I nailed and glued them to the top. I applied the stain first since it didn’t matter much if it splashed, I could paint over it. Then I taped off the stained slats and painted the rest. I don’t usually fill my kreg holes, because I find the plugs to be hit-or-miss most of the time, and it’s a lot of wood filler or dap. I just smoosh paint or stain inside them and they’re not very noticeable. Like you, I’m leery of the chemically treated wood. Typically if I build an outdoor project I use cedar. I think if you’re sure to coat your project in outdoor grade sealer, it should be okay for the most part, so long as you keep it out of a lot of rain. Though I live where there’s a ton of humidity (like 90% very often) and my boards do warp over time. I built the Farmhouse table nearly two years ago now, and there are already gaps. But, this was also before discovering the Kreg jig, so that may not be as much of an issue now.

      Again, take my advice with a grain of salt. I’m not a pro, and have only been doing this for a few years now. Have you posted this on the Knock Off Wood facebook page? There are some great woodworkers there who are very helpful!

  2. Stephanie

    Thanks for your answers! I’ve been making furniture about a year and a half so I’m not a total novice but I second guess myself a lot. I have asked a few questions and posted some of my finished peices on fb… I’m making a couple of the adult sling chairs for teacher gifts. SO while they are meant to be used outdoors, they aren’t meant to be kept in the elements. I wanted to make them out of cedar but the cedar boards available from blue and orange were so crooked. I bought all the materials and the special outdoor poly for the wood so I’m hoping that will suffice. I made an outdoor table last summer and didn’t paint the slats prior… one year in the GA heat and humidity has left it looking a bit wonky. I use it as a work table most of the time now:-)

  3. Miss Charming

    Wow! Such a creative girl! You did a wonderful job, killer b. I love the design of the table and the cute way you painted it. Good luck at the auction!

    1. Thank you Miss Charming! I’m keeping my fingers crossed that it does well!

  1. A Hand Built Holiday » Killer b. Designs | Killer b. Designs

    [...] Charlie a Little Helper Tower and her own version of the Surfboard Table and Stools. She loved this one I made for the Austin Boxer Rescue charity [...]

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